Bicycle Path along I-15

In the course of doing research on old US 395 and I-15 in the Miramar area, I came upon a very interesting set of plans. In 1979, a bicycle path was constructed along what is now Kearny Villa Road from Harris Plant Road to Carroll Canyon Road. While there are some details about this path still missing, such as why it was built, who was able to use it (being in a military base), and when it was closed. In time I hope to find these things out. In the meantime, I have the plans for the path itself.

Cover sheet for the I-15 Bikeway. This shows where the bikeway was built on a new alignment from Harris Plant Road to Miramar Way.
Cover sheet for the I-15 Bikeway. This shows where the bikeway was built on a new alignment from Harris Plant Road to Miramar Way.

StartingĀ at Harris Plant Road, bicyclists were directed from Kearny Villa Road, across the freeway, to Altair Road. About 1/4 mile north on Altair Road, the Class I bicycle path began. It followed Altair Road for a short distance, crossed under the freeway at San Clemente Canyon, and then followed the east side of the freeway. Once it joined with Ammo Road, it was basically a Class II bike lane. The lane followed the shoulder of I-15 from near Miramar Way all the way to Carroll Canyon Road, where it exited the freeway and terminated.

Gates at the main entrances of the Class I sections.
Gates at the main entrances of the Class I sections.
Signage posted at the bikeway gates. The lower sign seems to point toward a limited access to the path.
Signage posted at the bikeway gates. The lower sign seems to point toward a limited access to the path.

Much of the Class I sections of the path remain today, albeit closed off. I had seen the roadway many times before in aerial photography and from the ground while inspecting the old freeway. I never knew what it was, other than a rather narrow roadway. The path was the first instance of bicycle specific infrastructure in this area. It wouldn’t be the last, as the current Kearny Villa Road freeway still retains a buffered bike lane today. While it is not yet known what prompted this path to be built, it does show that Caltrans has at least been trying to help cyclists in this area for quite some time. I do find it rather interesting that the path was built just a few years before this section of freeway was bypassed. I suspect, though do not officially know, that the path was abandoned not long after the bypass in 1983. A bit more research is still necessary to determine that.

Detail of a portion of the path from Altair Road to the San Clemente Canyon bridge.
Detail of a portion of the path from Altair Road to the San Clemente Canyon bridge.
Remnant of the path near San Clemente Canyon.
Remnant of the path near San Clemente Canyon.
Closeup of the path, with a short section of yellow centerline striping visible near the top.
Closeup of the path, with a short section of yellow centerline striping visible near the top.