Wigwags – Part 2

In Anaheim, there exists an unlikely sight. Here, in 2014, there is an operational wigwag near an orange grove in Orange County. It is not known how long either will last, though hopefully will be preserved to show what things used to be like here. These glimpses of the past are getting rarer indeed.

This site is located at the corner of Santa Ana St and Lemon St in central Anaheim, between Anaheim Blvd and Harbor Blvd.

Closeup of the wigwag.
Closeup of the wigwag.
Looking east on Santa Ana St toward Lemon St. Wigwag is to the right.
Looking east on Santa Ana St toward Lemon St. Wigwag is to the right.

What is a “Sharrow”?

Sharrows. I’m sure you’ve seen them. Perhaps you’ve even heard about them. What do they mean? A “sharrow” or Shared Lane Marking is a newer addition to roadway striping. They are designed to be along major bicycle routes where a bicycle lane is impractical. The markings show that motorists should not only expect to see cyclists but they should also be further out in the lane.

Sharrows on Howard Ave near 30th St.
Sharrows on Howard Ave near 30th St.

The rules behind these markings are fairly simple. They must be 11′ from the curb and beyond the “door zone”. These sharrows cannot be on roadways with a speed limit greater than 35 mph, though there are some exceptions such as Park Blvd through Balboa Park, which is signed as 40 mph. When a roadway is not marked with sharrows, the rules are still the same. According to the California Vehicle Code (CVC 21202(a)), a cyclist doesn’t always have to ride to the right side of the roadway. The term used is “as far right as practicable”. This means that if roadway conditions warrant, a cyclist may travel away from the right side. When a roadway is marked with sharrows, cyclists should ride with the tires lining up with the arrows.

So, Sharrow or no, a roadway must be shared with cyclists.

Reference:

California MUTCD 2014 – Ch. 9C.07

Out of the Lake: Old Highway 178 and the town of Isabella

Long before the Isabella Reservoir was built in the 1950’s, State Highway 178 passed through the Kern River Valley on an alignment much different than it is today.

With the current drought, Lake Isabella is a puddle of what it used to be…but it’s amazing what the lake has hidden all these years.  The lake has not been this low since 1977 and is the second lowest level since the dams were finished in 1953.

In April, I took two trips back to the areas near where the original towns of Isabella and Kernville stood before the lake covered them and their history.  Unfortunately during my visit, the actual townsite of Isabella was still under several feet of water but the remains of the trees that use to shade the town are clearly visable sticking out of the lake in several photos.

Map to April 2014 photos

Pre-Lake Isabella Alignment 2.1_Page_1b

IMG_0467a
location 1
IMG_0469a
Location 1

 

Location 2 – Notice the high water mark
location 2
location 3

 

Location 3 - Kissack Cove
Location 4 – Kissack Cove

 

Location 4 - Paradise Cove
Location 5

 

Location 6
Location 6

 

7bw
Location 7 – 1940
IMG_0063a
Location 7 – 2014

 

Location 8 - 1940
Location 8 – 1940
Location 8 - 2014
Location 8 – 2014
Location 8 -2014

 

A sign of the times.
A sign of the times…very dry indeed.
Isabella Auxiliary Dam 2014. Eerie to drive at the base of the dam when there should be 50 feet deep water here!

 

Thanks to Joel Windmiller for his assistance and historical photos of Old Isabella.

 

North Burbank UP – Videos

On Tuesday, May 13, 2014, I took the opportunity to ride up to Burbank and get some videos of the North Burbank UP with my GoPro camera. Despite the extreme heat, I managed to at least get some good video. These videos show the North Burbank Underpass and ancillary structures from all directions. They were taken to show what they were like before the closure and removal.

Northbound along San Fernando Blvd

Southbound along San Fernando Blvd

Southbound from San Fernando Blvd to Victory Place (Future San Fernando Blvd)

Northbound Victory Place to San Fernando Blvd

Southbound from I-5 at Buena Vista St to San Fernando Blvd

Wigwags in Southern California – Part 1

A Wigwag is an older form of railroad grade crossing protection. It was also known as a Magnetic Flagman. Think of it as a mechanical version of a person waving a railroad lantern to help “protect” a train crossing a roadway. These are now extremely rare to see as they don’t have gates in addition to the flashing lights.

I’ve either found or learned of only a few in Southern California. In the Los Angeles area, there is only one left – on 49th St between Pacific Blvd and Santa Fe Ave in Vernon along the BNSF Railway.

Full assembly with crossbucks on a separate pole.
Full assembly with crossbucks on a separate pole.
Built by the Magnetic Signal Company of Los Angeles, California.
Built by the Magnetic Signal Company of Los Angeles, California.
Control box with milepost information.
Control box with milepost information.

Addtional Wig-Wag Locations:

North Burbank UP to close on May 20, 2014

Looking southbound toward the overhead.
Looking southbound toward the overhead.

After serving the traveling public faithfully since 1941, the North Burbank Underpass on San Fernando Blvd in Burbank will close permanently on May 20, 2014. It is one of the more significant structures on old US 99 in the San Fernando Valley. Somewhat ironically, the structure will be replaced with a new interchange at Empire Ave. San Fernando Blvd will be rerouted back to its pre-1941 alignment, this time without a grade crossing. So, get out there and take your pictures while you can. Do the same for any other sections of old highway. You never really know how long they will last.

For more information:

Streetcar tracks in Bankers Hill

While riding home today from downtown San Diego, I passed some construction on 5th Ave between Olive St and Palm St. It seems that the tracks from the #1 San Diego Electric Railway line are still in place. I had thought most of these tracks were long since torn up. Instead, as seen on Park Blvd, the tracks are merely buried under a few inches of asphalt.

Southbound and one northbound track at Olive St
Southbound and one northbound track at Olive St
Southbound rails in place.
Southbound rails in place.
Side view showing three rails within the trench.
Side view showing three rails within the trench.

Los Angeles And Salt Lake Railroad – Santa Ana River Bridge

In the Jurupa area of Riverside, there is a really neat old railroad bridge. Built in 1904, it was a part of the former San Pedro, Los Angeles, and Salt Lake Railroad, a subsidiary of the Union Pacific Railroad. This bridge is fairly unique in Southern California in that it is a concrete arch design instead of the usual steel truss type. As it is also a single-track bridge, additional traffic may warrant an additional span.

View of the west side of the span.
View of the west side of the span.
Deck view showing the single-track and architectural features
Deck view showing the single-track and architectural features
Santa Ana River above the bridge. This section of the river is open and not channelized.
Santa Ana River above the bridge. This section of the river is open and not channelized.
Detail of the architectural features.
Detail of the architectural features.